How long can a 9 month old stay awake?

Age Typical amount of sleep in 24 hours Typical awake time
6-12 weeks 14-17 hours 60-90 minutes
3-6 months 13-15 hours 1.5-2.5 hours
6-9 months 12-15 hours 2-3.5 hours
9-12 months 12-14 hours 3-4 hours

How long should a 9 month old be up between naps?

2-4 months: 1.5-3 hours between naps. 5-8 months: 2.5-3 hours between naps. 9-12 months: 2.5-4 hours between naps.

How long can a 10 month old stay awake?

“They should be able to stay awake for three to four hours between naps.” She adds that there are a small percentage of kids who start to go down to one nap around 11 to 12 months, but dropping the morning nap typically happens around 15 months.

What happens if baby stays awake too long?

Long awake times can be detrimental to your newborn

If your baby has been awake beyond this ”happily awake span” you have likely missed some sleepy signals, and your newborn is overtired. An overtired baby will be fussy and find it hard to sleep, yet won’t be able to stay happily awake, either.

How much milk should a 9 month old drink?

At this age, many babies will drink about 3 to 5 ounces of breastmilk from a bottle. Keep in mind that every baby is different, and it is normal if your baby eats less sometimes and more other times.

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How many words should a 10 month old say?

Most children speak their first word between 10 to 14 months of age. By the time your baby is a year old, he or she is probably saying between one to three words. They will be simple, and not complete words, but you will know what they mean. They may say “ma-ma,” or “da-da,” or try a name for a sibling, pet, or toy.

How many naps should a 10 month old have?

By 10 months, your baby may be down to a single one-hour nap during the day. but there’s nothing to worry about if they are still taking 2 naps. If you’re going to skip a nap, it’s better to skip the morning one. An after-lunch nap will help baby stay awake through the afternoon and avoid pre-bedtime crankiness.

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