Is it cheaper to make your own baby food or buy it?

And homemade non-organic is almost 43% cheaper than store-bought non-organic. … And if time is money, it’s important to factor in how long it takes me to cook and puree my own baby food. So, in about an hour I can make all her food for the week.

How much does it cost to make baby food at home?

“Canned baby food is the same price per ounce no matter the flavor, whereas the price of produce varies greatly,” Kate says. She found banana was the most economical homemade baby food, coming in at 12 cents per serving. Most homemade options range from about 14 cents per serving for carrots to 39 cents for apples.

How much do you save making baby food?

You can save quite a bit of money by making your own food. It’s estimated that making your own baby food costs you a third of what it costs to buy commercial baby food. A 4 ounce jar of baby food costs about $0.50. If your baby eats 3 jars a day, that equates to $45 per month.

Can I make baby food instead of buying it?

Homemade Baby Food: Advantages of Making It Yourself

It’s more economical than buying pre-packaged foods (although some parents note that this is not always the case). They can choose their own fruits, vegetables, and other foods for purees, instead of relying on the flavors chosen by manufacturers.

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Is it safe to make baby food at home?

“The quality of processed baby food is no longer an issue — there are high-quality, natural baby foods on store shelves now, and most well-known brands have good safety records,” she says. “But if parents want to make homemade food, it’s fine as long as they do it safely.”

How long does it take to make baby food?

Most babies are ready for these sorts of purees around 7-8 months, or once they’ve mastered thinner purees. (Again, since I like to do a combined baby feeding approach with both baby led weaning and purees, I don’t worry too much about following the calendar to decide when to introduce these.)

Why store-bought baby food is bad?

The vast majority of packaged baby foods and snacks contain one or more heavy metals like arsenic or lead — with rice-based snacks and infant cereals, teething biscuits, fruit juice, and jarred carrots and sweet potatoes being the worst offenders, according to a recent report by the nonprofit Healthy Babies Bright …

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